What is Mindfulness

Mindfulness is a simple and powerful practice which teaches you how to give your full attention to what is happening while it is happening, in a bid to better handle the pressures of everyday life.

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Benefits of Mindfulness

Stress evolved as a survival mechanism enabling humans to react promptly to life-threatening situations. But beyond a certain point, when stress is activated by events which we simply don’t like, it stops being helpful and starts to damage our health.

Mindfulness has been shown to reduce this chronic activation of what is also known as the fight or flight response, thus regulating the activation of the amygdala, and changing the brain’s neural pathways. Mindfulness meditators become more resilient to stress and improve their psychological states.

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We often leave our wellbeing for ‘some day’ in the belief that things will one day be better, and that somehow we’ll be more deserving. Automatic pilot is now running the show, and we are not aware of how harmful our habitual way of thinking and feeling can be. By intentionally bringing our attention back to our immediate experience, Mindfulness helps us recognise automatic pilot, gives us the tools to be able to make wiser choices, and reduces our reactivity, thus promoting our wellbeing.

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Living with pain and illness, especially when it is long-term, can have a devastating impact on our mental health and our general wellbeing. Pain is the body’s way of warning us something is not quite right, and it is difficult to ignore. It is often made worse by our natural instinct to avoid pain and our habit of dwelling on what we do not like.

Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction (MBSR) was originally conceived to help people living with chronic pain make wiser choices and relate to their pain differently. Mindfulness seems to allow pain sufferers to turn down the volume on pain signals.

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We live in a world of distractions, yet being able to focus is essential. Research shows that almost half of our waking day, we are thinking about what is not happening. The more routine our activity, the more our minds wander. More often than not our thoughts are negative and repetitive.

There is strong evidence that a Mindfulness practice reduces mind-wandering because we learn to observe an object of attention, say our breath, and every time the mind wanders we intentionally return to the exercise at hand. The more you practice the easier it gets and the better you become at it.

Source

Benefits of Mindfulness

Stress

Stress evolved as a survival mechanism enabling humans to react promptly to life-threatening situations. But beyond a certain point, when stress is activated by events which we simply don’t like, it stops being helpful and starts to damage our health.

Mindfulness has been shown to reduce this chronic activation of what is also known as the fight or flight response, thus regulating the activation of the amygdala, and changing the brain’s neural pathways. Mindfulness meditators become more resilient to stress and improve their psychological states.

Source

Wellbeing

We often leave our wellbeing for ‘some day’ in the belief that things will one day be better, and that somehow we’ll be more deserving. Automatic pilot is now running the show, and we are not aware of how harmful our habitual way of thinking and feeling can be.

By intentionally bringing our attention back to our immediate experience, Mindfulness helps us recognise automatic pilot, gives us the tools to be able to make wiser choices, and reduces our reactivity, thus promoting our wellbeing.

Source

Health

Living with pain and illness, especially when it is long-term, can have a devastating impact on our mental health and our general wellbeing. Pain is the body’s way of warning us something is not quite right, and it is difficult to ignore. It is often made worse by our natural instinct to avoid pain and our habit of dwelling on what we do not like.

Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction (MBSR) was originally conceived to help people living with chronic pain make wiser choices and relate to their pain differently. Mindfulness seems to allow pain sufferers to turn down the volume on pain signals.

Source

Focus

We live in a world of distractions, yet being able to focus is essential. Research shows that almost half of our waking day, we are thinking about what is not happening. The more routine our activity, the more our minds wander. More often than not our thoughts are negative and repetitive.

There is strong evidence that a Mindfulness practice reduces mind-wandering because we learn to observe an object of attention, say our breath, and every time the mind wanders we intentionally return to the exercise at hand. The more you practice the easier it gets and the better you become at it.

Source

How to learn Mindfulness

Courses and Workshops

It has been proven that attending courses and workshops is the most effective way to learn Mindfulness.

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Read Books

Reading a book is a great and very personal way to get what you want out of your Mindfulness practice, for adults and children.
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How to learn Mindfulness

Courses and Workshops

It has been proven that attending courses and workshops is the most effective way to learn Mindfulness.

Learn More

Read Books

Reading a book is a great and very personal way to get what you want out of your Mindfulness practice, for adults and children.

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More about Mindfulness

Mindfulness combines the best of ancient wisdom and modern science into a set of simple practices that can be learnt by anyone.

It is a simple practice because we learn to pay attention to, and become aware of,  what is happening as it is happening. We do so by intentionally observing sensations, thoughts, and emotions as they arise moment by moment, and by not being harsh with ourselves when our mind wanders.

Mindfulness is an effective practice because it breaks the habit of getting lost in thought,  which according to scientific research (1) is how we spend almost half of our waking hours. With time this ‘being lost in thought’ generates additional stress to the already existing pressures of everyday life.Mindfulness helps us reduce this unnecessary stress.

(1) Source

What people say about Mindfulness